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Important HR Updates for Companies Hiring in NYC

Important HR Updates for Companies Hiring in NYC

As a trusted business advisor and partner, we strive to bring any matter of business to your attention. NYC recently enacted the salary transparency provisions to the New Yok City Human Rights Law to protect the rights of prospective employees. This law goes into effect today, November 1, 2022. Here is a link with additional details. Background […]

As a trusted business advisor and partner, we strive to bring any matter of business to your attention. NYC recently enacted the salary transparency provisions to the New Yok City Human Rights Law to protect the rights of prospective employees. This law goes into effect today, November 1, 2022.

Here is a link with additional details.

Background

Most employers in New York City will now be required to list the salary range on all posted job ads, promotions and transfer opportunities. The law specifically states that beginning Nov. 1, “employers advertising jobs in New York City must include a good faith salary range for every job, promotion, and transfer opportunity advertised.” A “good faith” range is one that the employer “honestly believes at the time they are listing the job advertisement that they are willing to pay the successful applicant(s),”.

This law applies to businesses with four or more employees (including the owner or individual employer), where at least one person is working in New York City. Employers must post the minimum and maximum salary on offer for a particular role when it’s listed on an internal job board, as well as external sites like LinkedIn, Glassdoor, Indeed and other job search platforms. It also applies to any written description of an open job that’s printed on a flyer, distributed at a job fair or submitted to newspaper classifieds.

The salary requirement is specific to base salary, whether it’s annual or hourly, but employers are not required to list ancillary benefits such as health insurance, time off, severance pay, overtime pay, commissions, tips, bonuses, stock, 401(k) matching or other types of compensation. Salary ranges must be specific and can’t be open-ended (e.g. $15 an hour and up).

Employers can be subject to civil penalties of up to $250K for uncured violations.